Saturday, December 11, 2021

The Season of Avoiding the Calorie Count

During this time of year, our two (three?) persimmon trees outside begin to produce abundantly. The entire harvest arrives in less than two weeks and if we are efficient we can get to them before the raccoons. They cannot be eaten until fully ripe as they are very astringent when firm. So we harvest and let them sit out until they are quite soft to the touch and almost translucent in appearance. The tree itself has showy fall color.
Once they are as soft as a firm pudding I can puree them for recipes.
...such as persimmon cookies. Some for the freezer and others for the cookies jar.  I now have too much puree.  I am going to try adding them to pre-packaged lemon and orange cake mixes as an experiment.
I have brought my citrus trees inside to the tiny corner of my kitchen and they have gone crazy with both blossoms and fruit at the same time! Below are my kaffir lime tree and my Meyer lemon tree.  The harvested kaffir are the size of golf balls.



Oddly the fragrance of the citrus blossoms is not as full as when they are blooming outside in the spring. But the kaffir juice and shaved rind are perfect for a warming winter curry.
And today I sort the persimmons for ripeness and begin again!

15 comments:

  1. This sounds really idyllic to those of us with no access to fruit trees. Such color. I imagine the smell is wonderful?

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  2. How wonderful! I love persimmons. :-)

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  3. I wanted a persimmons tree until the talk of drought here has dissuaded me for now. Hopefully, that will pass and I can get one and keep the Meyer lemon tree going (something keeps eating its leaves.

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  4. I had to look persimmon up on the internet as I had never heard of it before.

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  5. Surely you can overlook the calories in persimmon -- they gotta be good for you. Don't they have Vitamin C and fiber and maybe some other nutrients? Btw, love your window frame!

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  6. The persimmon adventure sounds wonderful.

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  7. I almost never have persimmons. I guess I should buy one when I see them in the store.
    And your home grown lemons and limes! Yum.

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  8. A friend had a persimmon tree (she sold and moved out of state) and she would gift me some now and then. I found the best way to eat them was with vanilla ice cream.

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  9. If the persimmons like vanilla ice creams so much could they be added to an apple pie and served with the ice cream?
    What an inspiring entry. Thanks.

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  10. A ripe persimmon is simply a joy. Do they riped on the tree, or are they like avocados and don't ripen until picked?

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  11. I admire your kitchen handiwork and love of growing things. I don't think I've ever had a persimmon! I'm comforted to know I'm not the only old time blogger (since 2005). Nice to catch up.

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  12. Oh yikes! I'm so sorry you are being hit by so much spam.
    I am really impressed with all your fruit. My husband would be so jealous of your persimmons which he LOVES.

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  14. Nice you can bring your trees inside. I discovered I liked persimmons when I finally had one after having heard mostly negative reports on them.

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  15. I would love to try persimmons. You're lucky to have it.

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